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Fig. 2 | Biotechnology for Biofuels

Fig. 2

From: Evolutionary engineering improves tolerance for medium-chain alcohols in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Fig. 2

Reverse engineering of gcd1-1, gcd7-2, and sui2-2 in gcd1D, gcd7D, and sui2D strains, respectively. For the gcd1 allelic variants, strains sSD003, sSD053, and sSD029 were grown in 10 ml YPD in the absence (a) or presence (b) of 0.15% n-hexanol, and their μ avg values are shown. For the gcd7 allelic variants, strains sSD006, sSD054, and sSD040 were grown in 10 ml YPD in the absence (c) or presence (d) of 0.15% n-hexanol, and their μ avg values are shown. For the sui2 allelic variants, strains sSD021, sSD055, and sSD056 were grown in 10 ml YPD in the absence (e) or presence (f) of 0.15% nhexanol, and their μ avg values are shown. For the gcd1 allelic variants, strains sSD021, sSD060, and sSD058 were grown in 10 ml YPD in the absence (g) or presence (h) of 0.15% n-hexanol, and their μ avg values are shown. The μavg values for WT, sSD003, sSD006 and sSD021 in the absence of alcohol are also given in the text and they are shown here for comparison with relevant reverse-engineered strains. The values for WT, sSD003, sSD006 and sSD021 in the presence of 0.15% n-hexanol are the same as in Fig. 1 and are given for comparison. Identical data for WT are shown in multiple plots for comparison and data for strain sSD021 is shown in both e, f and g, h for comparison. Values are means ± standard deviation from three independent cultures

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